Empyrean #3

If you have Trypophobia look away now! I experimented with a different type of reaction with some of these outputs in particular the image above as at this point in the fun of this creative outpouring I started throwing in different elements at different times to see what transpires. Vinegar and baking soda made those frothy, bubbly effects like the cells of some sort of plant peered under a microscope, or the many eggs of some alien species about to burst.

Empyrean #2

A second cluster of images from this weeks Kick About inspired by textile artist – Louise Baldwin. These images were created in a very lofi method of simply mixing a plethora of ingredients including vegetable oil, water, food colouring and an alka seltzer tablet in a bell jar and capturing the mesmerising reaction as it occurred and settled. In some photographs the sphere of the jar can be seen, like some sort of technicolour meteorite shower heading to an unknown land.

Empyrean #1

This weeks Kick About over on Red’s Kingdom is contemporary textile artist – Louise Baldwin. I felt a very instinct reaction to this weeks kick about and wanted to focus on two things – shapes and colour. I reconcile one of the most enjoyable kick about’s thus far being the prompt and singular word “Souvenir” where I set up a miniature installation in my bedroom entitled Giant in a Jar and took photographs of garishly lit jars to then superimpose my hairy mug into that jar. The innate feeling of fuck knows how this will turn out but transforming to elation when something clicks and having it work out is always such an enjoyable experience that I want to reproduce.

So I went to my cupboards and my roommates to see what I could get my grubby hands on including, vegetable oil, food colouring, vinegar, baking soda and alkaline seltzers. I then set the stage using that same jar from Souvenir to create a makeshift lava lamp and tried to capture the reaction when I added all the ingredients and after the final plop of the alka seltzer in all its bubbly, frothy, fizzy spectacle. The original plan was to photograph the side of the jar as the reaction occurred but it proved rather limp and blurry, but having a look through the top of the jar and repositioning the many lights brimming up the scene changed things drastically. These miniature galaxies full of depth began to form with and the feeling it gave was utterly intoxicating. In the early hours of the morning when most other people were sleeping I was taking hundreds of photos of this concoction in a jar so expect a lot more to come.

Black And White Haze

Before you embark and get lost among Roosters Rest Woods, where a lot of photography has been taken such as here, here and here, you first have to climb the picturesque trail that wraps its way up a steep hill. The hill overlooking the neighbouring fields and farms like patchwork not visible in these photos. On the decline, before the tunnel of trees you are greeted with the curious bleating of sheep as they watch in amusement as I jump over fences and gates to disappear amongst the sitka spruces. It was a typical rainy day in Ireland when these photos were taken, not the fun kind of rain that it is a joy to watch where it bounces off everything but the misty kind where it clings to your clothes and saturates everything, and on this day – my camera lens. Although I do like this kind of mist as it adds to the effect of diffusing the scenery, blurring the boundaries of distance and softening the silhouettes of those pesky sheep.

Fragments #2

A second cluster of collages for this weeks John Stezaker Kick About. The likes of Ernst Haeckel’s botany illustrations, Anton Kerners “Plantscapes” and some garish dental illustrations make up the smorgasbord of cutouts in these depictions. I have learned that I really enjoy fabricating collages – Like all creatives processes there is a time when everything looks a mess with no cohesiveness whatsoever, but a certain shape will flourish and be a golden nugget that will spark something in the right direction – by moving something here, scaling something there, a whack of colour here, a penis there, things start to manifest into from – like the final missing puzzle piece.

Fragments #1

This weeks Kick About over on Red’s Kingdom is the freakish portrait photography of John Stezaker entitled Marriage (Film Portrait Collage), where photographs of celebrities are split into uncanny cacophonies. Because Stezaker drew inspiration from Dadaism and Surrealism by kit-bashing and appropriating images into bizarre collages, I decided to splice together some absurdities in a fun – no fucks given kind of way, all images nicked from the public domain of course.

The Lighthouse Keeper – Stills #2

A further collection of images from my latest short film – The Lighthouse Keeper. One of the most difficult shots to film was the boat scene, I went through a few different iterations of cutouts with varying levels of successes and failures. I originally tried to use the same cutout of the man from the previous scenes but I wanted this scene to be fairly wide angled to show a lot of the landscape as the man moves towards the lighthouse. I had to make a new cutout of our hero about one thirds the size of the original and get it just right as the weight from the LED light and lantern on the right meant that it was heavier and in previous attempts warped the paper and flopped the boat downwards – making it difficult to move across the screen. A nice surprise that happened with this scene is when the cutout was slightly further away from the stage, the blue LED lights lit below bled onto the boats undercarriage and helped allude to water. Another scene that was difficult was the pinnacle moment when the Hero lights the lighthouse with his lantern… the amount of times I filmed this because the characters arm was ripped off because of the weight of the LED is something I don’t want to mention – it actually was disemboweled a few frames after what is shown, but you would never know that.

The Lighthouse Keeper – Stills #1

The first group of stills from my latest short film – The Lighthouse Keeper. Originally the colour of this film was going to be all warming sepia tones coupled with inky blacks, I found this lovely textured brown packing paper thrown amongst the pile of amazon boxes and discarded clothes in the store room of our house, after sticking the packing paper onto the picture frame that would become the stage and lighting it from behind – I soon realised that the paper was too thick and the resulting black silhouettes were not as prominent as I liked, I needed the paper to be thin enough and the light to be strong enough that you could see some elements within the distance of the protagonist, to show more depth but also show that he is moving from a variety of different landscapes. I ended up using white grease paper and as for the colour changes I bought a strip of LED lights for previous long exposure experiments that ended up working well with the grease paper so a lot of the colours chosen for pinnacle parts in the film are meant to bring the viewer deeper into the psyche of the protagonist using colour theory.

The Lighthouse Keeper – Short Film

Truth be told when I decided I wanted to make a short film for this kick about regarding the strange landscape of Dungeness and Derek Jarman’s Prospect Cottage and garden I was feeling rather blue when the idea came to me. I don’t know why I sometimes torture myself when I feel sad, but the melancholy song that brings tears to my eyes entitled Twice by one Swedish group I admire called Little Dragon was playing in my head on a loop. A lot of the scenes from The Lighthouse Keeper are inspired by the gorgeous music video which can be seen here. The original story for The Lighthouse Keeper was a lot more melancholy, coinciding with how shit I felt, but I couldn’t accomplish it with just two hands and would have needed an assistant to help me with puppeteering the characters. While sitting on the idea for a while I decided to change the story to a more uplifting one so that I could accomplish it, and I think it turned out a better one.

I then abandoned this project for some time. The stage has been looming behind me for far too long as focusing in on perfectionism of the sets, lights, and movements of the characters felt relentless, trying to delve into a different medium one that is hands on and one that I can’t delete away mistakes was at times really testing. I really wanted the film to be as analogue as possible and for everything to be shot in camera, but realising it was an impossible approach and that I would have to rely on trickery done right to look like it was all in camera was the right methodology and ended up as a far more enjoyable experience. I leaned on newer technology as well as predeceasing technology that old films did so well.

A lot of behind the scenes footage has been filmed of what went into the making of this short film but I think I would rather let it be and not ruin the magic by showing how it is done… or showing the many instances where the stage toppled off the table, or when the characters arm flew off, or when my fan for the weather scene took everything along with it. Dismantling the stage, folding the grease paper, popping the many tools and props into jars and putting the little characters to rest in neat folders feels nice but in an odd way as there is something so unique and cherishing about finishing a film that you made with your hands, my bedroom certainly feels a lot roomier now that the stage is no longer.